Fun ways for girls to learn about Dr. King’s Legacy.

Here at Girls in the Game, it’s our mission to empower girls to be gamechangers. Our unique health, leadership and sports-based programs are designed to encourage girls of all ages to boldly pursue their dreams.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is the perfect example of a gamechanger who said, “I have a dream,” and dedicated his life to fighting for what he believed in.

In honor of MLK Day, we have compiled a list of 5 activities to honor Dr. King and teach girls about diversity.

1. “I Have a Dream” Reflection

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called for an end to racial inequality when he delivered his famous, “I Have a Dream” speech on August 28, 1963. Dr. King shared his vision of a world in which all people lived in harmony, regardless of the color of their skin. We encourage you to share highlights and background information surrounding this famous address, then encourage children to reflect on their own dreams. Use the prompt, “What is a dream or vision you have that will make the world a better place?” You can either make this a writing exercise or an open discussion where each child has the opportunity to share their opinion.

2. The Women Behind the Movement

Although many are familiar with Rosa Parks, stories of the women and girls behind the Civil Rights movement are too often untold. From Ruby Bridges, a 6-year-old child who help desegregated the first southern elementary school, to the youngest Civil Rights protester, Audrey Faye Hendricks, the stories of these unsung Civil Rights heroes can help to inspire the next generation of girls to be the champions of the future. A Mighty Girl provides an awesome list of 40 books to help you teach kids about these heroes and their dedication to justice.

3. What is Diversity?

For younger ones, the word “diversity” can be difficult to understand. The Egg Diversity Activity from Kids’ Activity Blog is a simple way to help kids grasp big ideas like racial equality, diversity and accepting differences. All you’ll need is two different colored egg and a bowl. Have kids observe the differences between the two eggs. What do they think the eggs will look like on the inside? Crack them to find out. Incorporate Dr. King’s message about equality into your discussion as you see fit, using situations that kids will understand.

4. I Can Connect With That

Hands-on games are a great way for young girls to learn and for older girls to stay engaged. At Girls in the Game, we play a game called I Can Connect With That to find out the many ways we are all connected. Participants start off in a large group and the leader shares a statement about themselves. It can be anything from a favorite color to something more personal. Anyone in the group who agrees will link arms with that person. The game continues until all the participants are linked in a large circle. After completing this activity, be sure to discuss what brings us together. Encourage kids to think about how they can “connect” with everyone, even people who seem very different at first glance.

5. Volunteer in Your Community

Volunteering in your local community is a great way to celebrate Dr. King’s life. Each year, Girls in the Game’s Teen Squad volunteers by serving a meal at a homeless shelter or leading programming for younger girls. Encourage kids to think about how they can continue Dr. King’s legacy by finding big or small ways to give back.

This article was written in collaboration with Yakkety Yak
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